Canadian Journal of Undergraduate Research Panel Workshop

 

Mahta Amanian

Mahta Amanian is the Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Undergraduate Research (CJUR), a student-led journal that provides undergraduates across Canada an accessible platform to gain experience in the peer-review process and academic publishing. Having joined CJUR in 2016, Mahta has worked alongside a team of dedicated editors to increase both the number and diversity of submissions, enhance the peer-review process, and reach out to more students all across Canada. As an undergraduate student studying Microbiology & Immunology, Mahta understood the value in engaging in multidisciplinary dialogue early on in her academic career, and strongly believes that students can gain value in the opportunity CJUR provides.

Lorenzo Lindo

Lorenzo is a graduate student in the MSc Oncology program at UBC. He completed his BSc in Biology and Biochemistry at UBC and conducted a graduating project studying calcium cycling in the heart in mice with hyperinsulinemia. He his now a full-time researcher at BC Cancer. While his general research interest revolves around blood cancers, his thesis project specifically involves engineering improvements to immunotherapies to ameliorate efficacy and outcomes in multiple myeloma. In addition to his research, Lorenzo is a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Faculty of Science where he specializes in giving lessons and leading discussions about human anatomy and physiology. When not in the lab, he enjoys reading, bouldering, cycling, and playing the guitar.

Ryan Hong

Ryan Hong is a third year student at UBC pursuing a major in Microbiology & Immunology and a minor Sociology. He has held research positions at the DMCBH and the Department of UBC Psychology doing functional variomics research on autism-associated genes and its correlation to discrete intracellular signaling pathways in the brain. Ryan is especially interested in integrating state-of-the-art molecular and computational tools from interdisciplinary disciplines to study and address the complex nature of disease mechanisms in a more holistic manner.